Will Periscope, a Mobile App, Open Up Academic Conferences?

Technology is having a significant impact on the direction of higher education. With the advancements seen in on-line education and the use of technology within classrooms, I can see periscope or tools similar become a mainstay in today’s educational environment. Not only can this form of technology be used for conferences but it could be used to reduce the time in class needed for lecture providing more time for activities, discussions, simulations, etc. Even with on-line educational programs, live on-line interaction between students and professors would increase the retention and persistence in program completion. Periscope is only the beginning. I’m sure we will see educational friendly software that will make use in our classrooms more restrictive but effective for live communication. With regards to periscope, I’m sure conferences will require discloser agreements stating that the use of this technology is prohibited by attendees. This will allow conferences to control what and who is publicly released using this form of technology.

GlobalHigherEd

Link here for the Inside Higher Ed version of this entry which can more easily be shared & printed.

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Nearly 9,000 people, myself included, attended the annual conference of the Association of American Geographers (AAG) in late April 2015. The size of the conference has been growing over the last several decades and it has become a de facto international gathering despite the ‘American’ moniker; a trading space of sorts to present papers, share ideas, formulate collaborative research proposals, source prospective faculty, share gossip, have good times, etc. Of the 8,950 people who flew/drove/trained it to Chicago this April, 5,716 came from the US, 726 came from Canada, 666 from the UK, 257 came from China, and nearly equivalent numbers (35 vs 37) came from Singapore vs Mexico. All told, attendees came from 84 countries in total and they’re mapped out below courtesy of my department’s Cartography Lab

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Innovative and Engaging Communications in and Beyond the Academy

The traditional student entering our institutions of higher education are becoming more and more dependent on technology. Although technology can be used advantageously in the classroom, the integral concept of one on one communication is dying. Effective communication is essential in today’s workforce and necessary to socially integrated into our culture. So how do we get students to put down their phones or look up from their tablets or computers to actually listen to what others are saying? One of the biggest issues I see while instructing allied health care students is their inability to comprehend what others are truly saying. Even if they hear the words, they don’t understand body language, tone or inflection. Inevitably, this effects how the student can think critically during an assessment. Institutionally, our programs have had to rely on simulations to not only reinforce skills but how to ask questions, interpret answers and then readdress with follow up questions. Does anyone utilize any other techniques to improve communication skills within their programs?

GlobalHigherEd

Editor’s note: this guest entry has been kindly developed by Gisèle Yasmeen, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia, Canada. Dr. Yasmeen raises a series of important issues in the build-up to a call for a “structured dialogue” on the nature and role of knowledge in society.

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Innovative and Engaging Communications in and Beyond the Academy

Gisèle Yasmeen, University of British Columbia

Research and scholarship is primarily about asking and answering questions as well as conserving and constantly reinterpreting fragile and easily forgotten knowledge. When I started graduate studies more than 25 years ago, there was no talk of the world wide web, no blogs, no Twitterverse, Facebook, Academia.edu and so on. I grew up in an era of card catalogues, photocopying, typewriters and hand-written letters with supervisors and collaborators. My first experience with computers was with a mainframe “Amdahl” where you had to…

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Technology in Higher Education

The traditional student entering our institutions of higher education are becoming more and more dependent on technology.  Although technology can be used advantageously in the classroom, the integral concept of one on one communication is dying.  Effective communication is essential in today’s workforce and necessary to socially integrated into our culture.  So how do we get students to put down their phones or look up from their tablets or computers to actually listen to what others are saying?  One of the biggest issues I see while instructing allied health care students is their inability to comprehend what others are truly saying.  Even if they hear the words, they don’t understand body language, tone or inflection.  Inevitably, this effects how the student can think critically during an assessment.  Institutionally, our programs have had to rely on simulations to not only reinforce skills but how to ask questions, interpret answers and then readdress with follow up questions.  Does anyone utilize any other techniques to improve communication skills within their programs?